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No beer links (here) this week

01.16.17

At the risk of alienating all of those thoroughly frustrated last June when tickets to see Hamilton in Chicago went on sale, we were among the lucky ones who were able to buy them at face value. Worth every penny, but it means I was otherwise occupied this past weekend and there are no links here. Of course, Boak & Bailey posted their typically diverse selections Saturday: News, Nuggets & Longreads 14 January 2017: Spain, Sheffield and Sober Island

And I do hope you saw these tweets during the week.

Sigh

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Not-Monday beer links: You happy now, Alan?

German hopyard - because dormancy matters

NOT-MONDAY BEER AND WINE LINKS, MUSING, 12.23.16

Monday I wrote that regular Monday beer links would be taking the next two Mondays off. That remains true, but after Alan McLeod complained and because there’s some good stuff you should be reading, a few it’s-not-Monday links before we head over the Mississippi River and through the wood (yes, I am aware it is a Thanksgiving poem) … If you still need a link fix tomorrow (Saturday) morning try Boak & Bailey’s News, Nuggets & Longreads. Happy holidays.

Father and son bond over beer at all 73 Iowa craft breweries.
This is a road movie waiting to be made. [Via Des Moines Register]

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Monday beer links: Stone beer, DNA silliness & that word that’s not going away

MONDAY BEER & WINE LINKS, 12.19.2016

Editorial note: Weekly links will be on unpaid leave the next two Mondays. Regular service will resume Jan. 9 (01.09.2017 or 09.01.2017 depending on where you live).

Craft: The Lost Word.
So let’s head into 2017 with the optimistic thought we’ll quit talking about the word we put before beer and talk about beer itself, brewing, culture, ingredients, geography, or anything that does not involve bickering about a definition of something that which refuses to be defined. [Via Boak & Bailey’s Beer Blog]

Beer tailored to your DNA: London brewery creates the perfect pint based your genetic code.
No. Just no. I sense this story has legs, so wherever you read your headlines you’ll keep seeing it, often enough that you might believe that somebody has done a little investigating and established there’s a reason to pay going on $32,000 for 317 gallons of beer. (That’s the equivalent of 3,381 12-ounce servings, so almost $10 for each one.)

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Meet me in Kansas City Saturday

We’re headed to Kansas City this weekend. We’ll be eating smoked meat, drinking beer, meeting up with friends, and I am told there might be some shopping.

I might miss most of that shopping stuff to hang out with brewing friends. Feel free to join us.

Stop No. 1 will be at Glass to Grain Grain to Glass at 1 p.m. I’ll talk a little bit about essential oils, including some new discoveries related to hops and how other plants may be used to create hop-like aromas and flavors (with an assist from yeast). Stop by, listen, ask questions, bring any books (preferably ones I’ve written) you’d like signed. There will be books for sale, but that part is strictly optional.

Round No. 2 begins at 3 p.m. at Crane Brewing in Raytown. The brewery was under construction when I was there in the summer of 2015, so I’m looking forward to a tour from Michael Crane.

Under construction - Crane Brewing Co., Raytown, Mo.

I think everybody will be welcome to join in. After that Michael and I will talk about foraging for yeast and brewing with local yeast. We should be around there until about 6 p.m. Once again, bring questions as well as books to be signed. And there will be books for sale — holiday shopping made fun.

Monday beer links: Hop inspections, beer lists, BCS & ‘Hard Times’

ABBREVIATED MONDAY BEER & WINE LINKS, 11.28.2016

Unhappy New York Hop Inspection: 1827 to 1835.
Alan McLeod trips happily from one discovery about hop inspecting to another. A couple of passages from the 1973 edition of Steiner’s Guide to American Hops add to the conversation.

(The annual sale of hops) was greatly stimulated by a law passed in Massachusetts in 1806 providing for compulsory inspection and grading of all hops packed for export. Strict standards were set for inspection and sternly enforced with the result that Massachusetts “first sort” brand became known as the finest hops in the United States. The effects of the law were salutary. European customers insisted upon hops which had passed the Massachusetts inspection, and in consequence, such approved hops commanded a premium price.” Production grew from annual sales of 304,377 pounds between 1806 to 1815 to 595,451 between 1825 and 1835. (From History of Agriculture in the Northern United States, 1620-1863.)”

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