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Meet me in Kansas City Saturday

We’re headed to Kansas City this weekend. We’ll be eating smoked meat, drinking beer, meeting up with friends, and I am told there might be some shopping.

I might miss most of that shopping stuff to hang out with brewing friends. Feel free to join us.

Stop No. 1 will be at Glass to Grain Grain to Glass at 1 p.m. I’ll talk a little bit about essential oils, including some new discoveries related to hops and how other plants may be used to create hop-like aromas and flavors (with an assist from yeast). Stop by, listen, ask questions, bring any books (preferably ones I’ve written) you’d like signed. There will be books for sale, but that part is strictly optional.

Round No. 2 begins at 3 p.m. at Crane Brewing in Raytown. The brewery was under construction when I was there in the summer of 2015, so I’m looking forward to a tour from Michael Crane.

Under construction - Crane Brewing Co., Raytown, Mo.

I think everybody will be welcome to join in. After that Michael and I will talk about foraging for yeast and brewing with local yeast. We should be around there until about 6 p.m. Once again, bring questions as well as books to be signed. And there will be books for sale — holiday shopping made fun.

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Monday beer links: Hop inspections, beer lists, BCS & ‘Hard Times’

ABBREVIATED MONDAY BEER & WINE LINKS, 11.28.2016

Unhappy New York Hop Inspection: 1827 to 1835.
Alan McLeod trips happily from one discovery about hop inspecting to another. A couple of passages from the 1973 edition of Steiner’s Guide to American Hops add to the conversation.

(The annual sale of hops) was greatly stimulated by a law passed in Massachusetts in 1806 providing for compulsory inspection and grading of all hops packed for export. Strict standards were set for inspection and sternly enforced with the result that Massachusetts “first sort” brand became known as the finest hops in the United States. The effects of the law were salutary. European customers insisted upon hops which had passed the Massachusetts inspection, and in consequence, such approved hops commanded a premium price.” Production grew from annual sales of 304,377 pounds between 1806 to 1815 to 595,451 between 1825 and 1835. (From History of Agriculture in the Northern United States, 1620-1863.)”

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No Amarillo, Cascade, Centennial, Chinook, Citra, Galaxy, Mosaic or Simcoe allowed

This is simply a nifty little contest that Simply Hops, a division of the Barth-Haas Group, has put together. The premise is also pretty simple.

Question. What happens when you take away some of the main ingredients for making a big juicy IPA and then still demand that a big juicy IPA is brewed?

Answer. We find who the really talented brewers are.

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Monday beer links: Changing local culture, hops, in defense of pumpkin beers

MONDAY BEER & OTHER ALCOHOL LINKS, MUSING, 09.29.2016

Dah Dah Doo Dah Dah Dah Dah Dah Doo Dah La Ti Mi Fa La So Fa Mi.
At the moment last Monday I saw that John McPhee had written about taking his first drink, even if it wasn’t a beer, I knew what the first link would be here today. [Via The New Yorker]

Hopefully Just An Intermediate Stage.
While I think about what constitutes “beer news” (beyond the revelation they’ve named a hop after Ernest Salmon) I will offer a link to a blog Alan and the rest of you may not be reading (next). [Via A Good Beer Blog]

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Just in case Florida isn’t the next hop powerhouse

Conveniently enough yesterday @BeerAdvocate tweeted to a link to a story I wrote for the magazine not quite two years ago. It began, “The American hop market seldom finds a comfortable equilibrium for very long, simply because as essential as hops are in brewing beer, they serve almost no other commercial purpose.”

Business was booming then and it is booming now. Last week I revisited one of the reasons why, and Bryan Roth is posting about hops every day this week. In addition, last week Good Beer Hunting took notice of how acreage outside the Northwest is growing and All About Beer had a story about an attempt to grow hops in Florida.

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